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SA’s youngest woman doctor among those unemployed, pleads for help

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The scourge of unemployment leaves no field untouched, even medicine, with South Africa’s youngest woman medical doctor finding herself without a job and asking for help.

Dr Thakgalo Thibela completed matric with seven distinctions at the age of 15. File picture: Independent Newspapers

THE SCOURGE of unemployment leaves no field untouched, even medicine.

Even South Africa’s youngest woman medical doctor has found herself without a job and is asking for help.

Dr Thakgalo Thibela, 24, said she is eager and ready for service anywhere in the country.

“I happen to find myself as part of the over 800 unemployed doctors in South Africa currently,” said Thibela.

“I am willing and ready to serve anywhere in the country but that opportunity is not being afforded to me. I became a doctor because I wanted to help people, and not being able to do just that has been mentally taxing. Please help.”

ALSO READ: 800 doctors jobless, Health dept blames budgetary constraints

Thibela became the nation’s youngest woman medical doctor at the age of 21 after graduating from Wits University with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery.

She attended Farel Primary School in Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga, where she was smart enough to skip Grade 7, and then went on to Lehlasedi High School, where she skipped Grade 9.

Thibela finished her matric with seven distinctions at the age of 15.

She completed her internship at Helen Joseph Hospital and her community service at Mapulaneng Hospital and plans to become a neurosurgeon in the future.

Dr Siyaneliswa Shozi, who is the spokesperson for the 800 unemployed doctors, was at the forefront of the health workers’ march to the Department of Health.

Shozi said the march was intended to highlight discontent with the scarcity of doctor positions and to criticise the health department’s supposed lack of funds.

“We are calling for the employment of all doctors and allied health-care workers who are available to help our public health sector,” Shozi said.

“The government must rework their budget to accommodate all post-com serve (post-community service) doctors who are willing to work in government, and the Minister of Health must work on making sure that all resources needed to work are made available.”

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