Home South African Public sector strike must not affect matrics, pleads Sadtu

Public sector strike must not affect matrics, pleads Sadtu

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Concerns have been raised about possible interruptions to the matric exams with public sector workers planning to embark on industrial action on Thursday following the collapse of wage negotiations with the government.

File picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency (ANA)

CONCERNS have been raised about possible interruptions to the matric exams with public sector workers planning to embark on industrial action on Thursday following the collapse of wage negotiations with the government.

Last week, the Public Servants Association of South Africa (PSA) rejected the government’s offer to public servants of a 3% salary adjustment and continuation of a cash gratuity until March 31 next year.

The PSA filed a notice to strike on October 24 and can legally go on strike any time from Thursday, November 3.

In a statement issued by the PSA, it said that plans for the strike were under way as per the outcome of the ballot and mandating processes.

“The strike will be nationwide, and all PSA members are urged to participate as the government has shown nothing but disrespect to workers,” the statement read.

However, the South African Democratic Teachers Union (Sadtu) has pegged its stance that its members won’t be joining other public servants in a wage strike.

Sadtu spokesperson Nomusa Cembi confirmed the teachers union’s stance to not participate in the strike.

While speaking to news broadcaster eNCA, Sadtu Secretariat Officer Xolani Fakude said the matric class of 2022 could not afford more disruptions.

“We have not given an instruction (to strike) to our members, so therefore, it is our understanding and expectation that our members will be where we expect them to be, especially as we go toward this particular exam period.

“We would also want to send a message to our communities and others that no matter what disruptions we may want to have in terms of voicing our concerns, as community members and workers, let us make sure that we protect this phase as our young people sit for a very important exam in their lives,” Fakude said.

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