Home Opinion & Features Childish decision will affect CSA media relations

Childish decision will affect CSA media relations

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Former Proteas batsman and skipper, Graeme Smith had shown interest in the director position, but soon withdrew his candidacy citing “real concerns” which he reiterated to CSA

SOMEONE needs to tell the suits at Cricket SA (CSA) headquarters that they are digging their own graves fast by gagging the media from reporting about the mess at their office.

The management and other internal shenanigans at CSA have been doing the rounds and these have had a ripple effect on the field of play which has seen the Proteas without a permanent coach since CSA parted ways with Ottis Gibson in August.

His departure triggered the new positions, a director of cricket and a team.

We were told that the director of cricket will oversee all cricketing decisions within the system including the hiring of the team director (former head coaching position) and all the administrative and medical staff that are related to the national team.

But months have gone by without this post being filled. CSA’s chief executive Thabang Moroe and his team even missed the October deadline to appoint the director of cricket.

Former Proteas batsman and skipper, Graeme Smith had shown interest in the director position, but soon withdrew his candidacy citing “real concerns” which he reiterated to CSA.

The delay in making this appointment will hit the Proteas as the England summer tour kicks off

These crucial tourneys need to impress following our dismal World Cup .

CSA’s management should also shoulder the blame for the weak support that the Mzansi Super League (MSL) has been getting this year. Wanderers has failed to pull in the crowds despite running ticket-giveaways and sometimes allowing free entry to the first 1000 fans at the stadium.

CSA’s poor leadership traits showed its ugly head over the weekend when some cricket journalists had their accreditations for MSL matches blocked at the stadium.

It’s alleged that this decision was made by some of the board members who were retaliating against journalists who had previously failed to give them a right of reply on negative stories about CSA.

Their rejection meant that those who follow the sport through newspapers were denied a chance to read about the Jozi Stars-Paarl Rocks match.

A childish decision to bar journalists from stadiums has a ripple effect on innocent news consumers.

The ban has since been lifted but its impact will have longer-lasting effects on CSA’s relations with the media.