Home Sport Soccer Liverpool’s Klopp makes light of Adrian howler

Liverpool’s Klopp makes light of Adrian howler

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“Adrian had a swollen ankle and we played too many balls back to him in that period. I was happy with everything he did, all the saves, all that stuff”

Soccer Football - Premier League - Southampton v Liverpool - St Marys Stadium, Southampton, Britain - August 17, 2019 Liverpools Adrian reacts Action Images via Reuters/John Sibley EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or live services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.

Liverpool manager Juergen Klopp laughed off stand-in goalkeeper Adrian’s mistake in Saturday’s 2-1 Premier League victory over Southampton, joking that the howler was a “goalie thing” at the Merseyside club.

After forwards Sadio Mane and Roberto Firmino put Liverpool 2-0 ahead, new signing Adrian gifted Southampton a lifeline with a poor clearance that rebounded off Danny Ings and into the net.

But Klopp made light of the incident, comparing it to an error by his first-choice goalkeeper Alisson during a win over Leicester City last season.

Asked by reporters if he had spoken to Adrian, Klopp said: “Yes: ‘you finally arrived, welcome.’

“Ali did the same it’s a goalie thing at Liverpool, no problem with that as long as we win the games. All good.”

Adrian, who was deployed after Allisson suffered a long-term injury against Norwich, had been passed fit for the match after sustaining a freak injury while celebrating their midweek Super Cup victory over Chelsea.

“Adrian had a swollen ankle and we played too many balls back to him in that period. I was happy with everything he did, all the saves, all that stuff,” Klopp added.

“The other players have to then feel more the responsibility for the build-up and cannot give all the balls back to him and hope the painkillers still help.

Reuters