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SA’s Coghlan comet

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Surrounded by all the famous names in the game of rugby, Springbok wing sensation Aphiwe Dyantyi once again reminded the world that it is not where you come from and what skin colour you are that will determine what you become in life

Aphiwe Dyantyi of South Africa dives in to score during the 2018 Rugby Championship game between South Africa and Australia at Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth on 29 September 2018. Picture: Deryck Foster BackpagePix

There is a little known village between Engcobo and Mthatha in the Eastern Cape called Coghlan.

It is those hamlets that if you blink, you are most certainly going to miss it.

The run-down shops, garage and dusty streets are swallowed by the sea of poverty and underdevelopment that makes up the rural landscape of the former Transkei.

But that all changed on Sunday in Monaco where Coghlan’s brightest export and star stood speechless in the adoration of World Rugby’s royalty, even though the game that made him an instant global superstar long considered him a pauper in his home country.

Surrounded by all the famous names in the game of rugby, Springbok wing sensation Aphiwe Dyantyi once again reminded the world that it is not where you come from and what skin colour you are that will determine what you become in life.

As Dyantyi gingerly walked onto stage to pick up the Breakthrough Player of the Year award he looked lost, out of place and out of words at how quickly life had changed from running around his parents’ modest yard in Coghlan to having the world at his feet.

And it has been his feet that has had the rugby world in awe since he broke through the ranks for the Lions in Super Rugby, making his Test debut against England in June and scoring those two magical tries against the All Blacks in that famous Springbok win in Wellington this year.

Dyantyi is not a man of many words but when he does speak it is often profound.

But it is on the field where he has done a lot of his talking with his mesmerising skills, lightning quick speed and a natural feel for the game.

Unearthed gems

Dyantyi though is not a rare gem in South Africa, there are many unearthed gems like him that come from far flung villages like Coghlan that still need to be found by rugby.

What’s even more heartwarming and an inspiration about Dyantyi’s meteoric rise in rugby is that he never played first team rugby during his school days at Dale College.

The truth of the matter is that Dyantyi was lost to the game for a few years after completing his matric until the timely intervention of Chulumanco Macingwane who encouraged Dyantyi to play rugby again.

And with the unwavering support of his three brothers and parents, Dyantyi has been a star in the making through all the levels of rugby he has played in since kick starting his career playing koshuis rugby.

Dyantyi’s road to rugby stardom may not be as glittering as many of those who have worn the Springbok jersey in the past.

But it is one worth telling to inspire the thousands of children that have a dream to be a Springbok that no matter your circumstance or where you come from, your dreams can still come true.

Dyantyi is a reminder to South African rugby that there is still more to be done in taking rugby to the people and the time has long gone that rugby opens itself up to everyone regardless of what they look like or come from.

As the people of Engcobo often say “iNgcobo yidolophu nayo” (Engcobo is also a town), Dyantyi has elevated the status of Coghlan into “idolophu”.

Halala Qwathi, you are part of rugby royalty and now nobody will dare blink when stopping in Coghlan!