Home Sport Faf wants to protect death bowlers ahead of World Cup

Faf wants to protect death bowlers ahead of World Cup

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Rabada and Ngidi were particularly good in the third ODI in Hobart where they turned the screws on the Australian batting line-up to close out a 2-1 series victory

epa07172809 South African captain Faf du Plessis (R) congratulates players following the T20 International match between Australia and South Africa, at Metricon Stadium, on the Gold Coast, Australia, 17 November 2018. EPA-EFE/DAVE HUNT EDITORIAL USE ONLY, IMAGES TO BE USED FOR NEWS REPORTING PURPOSES ONLY, NO COMMERCIAL USE WHATSOEVER, NO USE IN BOOKS WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT FROM AAP AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT

Death bowling has been the Proteas’ Achilles heel almost dating back to their return from isolation.

Despite being blessed with several fast bowlers who were the envy of the cricket world at any given time, the final overs in white-ball cricket was always met with the same anticipation as a visit to the dentist.

It certainly takes a special character to want to bowl when the batsmen’s sole aim is to smash the ball to all parts. Not only must the bowler be blessed with special skills such as a devilish slower ball, the ability to produce reverse swing and, most importantly, send down a yorker almost at will, they also have to be equipped with the strongest of minds.

The Proteas are therefore incredibly blessed to have two such specimens at their disposal at the moment. The fact that Kagiso Rabada and Lungi Ngidi are only 23 and 22-years-old respectively makes it even more remarkable.

“Our death bowling is really strong at the moment,” Proteas captain Faf du Plessis (pictured) said upon the team’s arrival at Cape Town International yesterday after a hugely-successful limited-overs tour of Australia.

“Rightly, we have never had two guys together that are renowned for closing games down. We now feel, as least from my perspective as captain, that the two of them know what they are doing.”

Rabada and Ngidi were particularly good in the third ODI in Hobart where they turned the screws on the Australian batting line-up to close out a 2-1 series victory.

With a packed home international summer to come against Pakistan and Sri Lanka, along with the newly-formed Mzansi Super League where all the Proteas are expected to participate in, Du Plessis would like to see a process implemented where his blue-chip fast bowlers’ workloads are managed leading up to next year’s World Cup.

“I feel injuries are going to be a big thing (ahead of the World Cup).

“I don’t think we are the only team because there are a couple of teams that if you take out two fast bowlers, they are a different unit. That is something as a brains trust we will try to manage,” he said.