Home Sport Cricket Proteas need to be more proactive says Chloe Tryon

Proteas need to be more proactive says Chloe Tryon

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South Africa was bowled out in the 48th, for a total that Chloe Tryon said was about 70 runs short of par. She made 88 off 73 balls, and was the only Proteas batter to play with the requisite aggression.

South Africa women’s cricketer Chloe Tryon batting
South Africa was bowled out in the 48th, for a total that Chloe Tryon (pictured) said was about 70 runs short of par. Picture: John Davidson/www.photosport.nz/BackpagePix

Johannesburg – The Proteas are acutely aware that another limp batting performance is unacceptable in Friday’s second One-Day International against England.

South Africa were thrashed by five wickets in the first of the three ODIs, with the hosts reaching the below par target of 219 with 107 balls to spare in Northampton on Monday evening.

South Africa was bowled out in the 48th, for a total that Chloe Tryon said was about 70 runs short of par. She made 88 off 73 balls, and was the only Proteas batter to play with the requisite aggression.

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“We have to be a lot more positive with the bat and take the game to them,” Tryon, who struck 10 fours and three sixes said afterwards. “We played their game today and they outplayed us.

“We’ve got to be positive, build partnerships and be really proactive.”

It’s that last word that needs to be hammered home with the players in the next few days. Aside from Tryon, South Africa’s batters allowed England’s bowlers to dictate terms in what were ideal conditions for batting.

In what was the first match since Lizelle Lee announced her shock retirement from international cricket, the Proteas were crying out for someone in the top order to play her kind of aggressive role.

Laura Wolvaardt stuck with what has been successful for her, by anchoring the innings, but Andrie Steyn, her opening partner and Lara Goodall, found that the step up from Ireland – where they were very successful – to England, was a big one.

“We should have built a lot more partnerships, we got out at crucial times, which wasn’t ideal,” Tryon, the vice-captain, said. “Anna (Steyn) has been really frustrated with how she is getting out. We have to keep backing her, she’s been working really hard, and a big innings is just around the corner for her.”

Tryon brushed off Lee’s retirement as an excuse for the performance. “Unfortunately she isn’t here and we have to get on with it,” she said. “We’ve got the rest of this series, a T20 series, then the Commonwealth Games and a T20 World Cup at home next year, and it’s important to focus on that.”

Tryon’s innings and her partnership of 97 for the sixth wicket with Nadine de Klerk were the only highlights of a dismal performance. The English showed how they were willing to embrace the new aggressive attitude that has earned their men’s Test side so many plaudits in recent weeks.

In fact it is now very much the trend in the women’s game where more assertive batting is encouraged and it is the main reason the Australian side, the current World Cup holders, is so dominant.

South Africa, after some stellar performances at the World Cup, need a change in mindset if they are to keep up. A defeat can be excused, but not one in which they are as passive as was the case on Monday.

“The balls we could have put away we didn’t put away. If we’d had one good partnership up front and one towards the end we could have got a really competitive score,” said Tryon.

“The girls will reflect, and come back better.”

@shockerhess

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