Home Sport Soccer Chiefs players must get enough sleep during lockdown to prevent injury

Chiefs players must get enough sleep during lockdown to prevent injury

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Kaizer Chiefs head of sports science Jarred Marsh says everything has changed since the novel coronavirus pandemic struck.

Picture: Muzi Ntombela / BackpagePix

JOHANNESBURG – Kaizer Chiefs head of sports science Jarred Marsh says everything has changed since the novel coronavirus pandemic struck.

“Things have changed for us as Covid-19 has engulfed the world and impacted every aspect of life,” said Marsh.

“We are now lockdown is one of the safety measures to prevent the rapid spread of the virus. As footballers, we have had to modify our training methods with the aid of technology, because we are not training on the pitch as normal. This also affects our training schedule which for instance normally would have included matches.”

Marsh and the technical team have worked on a training programme that is adaptable to the lockdown conditions.

“We have provided players with guideline that will help them cope under these conditions,” adds Marsh.

“What is important is to keep and commit to a daily routine. The routine must incorporate sleeping on time and waking up according to a strict pattern. Research recommends seven to eight hours of sleep each night. Sleeping fewer hours can increase players’ chances of getting injured.

“It is key to stick to your normal routine that you followed prior to the restrictions. Adhere to set times and spend minimum time on social media. The trick there is that most of the news and information resources are delivered via technology. So, what we advise our players to reduce their screen time. At least switch off from the screen 60 minutes before sleep.”

With the current lockdown restrictions allowing outdoor exercising from 6-9 am, Marsh says they have now included a set of running sessions in their programme.

“Players have three running sessions per week in their programme. Each player responds differently from the impact of road running. We have devised sessions to allow players to build up the intensity of their exercising. The programme includes building a strong vascular base to allow the acceleration and slowing down movements which are part of football match functioning.

“Through video, the players are divided into smaller groups. We are able to monitor them via GPS. Every player has a GPS App through which we can monitor the distance covered, speed and his heart rate.

“We don’t know how much time we will be given to prepare for the remaining matches,” says Marsh.

“`It is going to be important after lockdown to prepare the team adequately. Lack of match exposure may cause injures and hamper the results and progress. We are looking forward to the day we return to the pitches.”


African News Agency (ANA)