Home conflict, war and peace Zulu royal household in strategic meetings to help calm KZN

Zulu royal household in strategic meetings to help calm KZN

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The Zulu royal household is currently engaged in meetings to decide on steps to be taken to bring calm to the province.

Reaction Unit South Africa has also had their hands full responding to calls of looting. The security company was patrolling using their helicopter in several towns and industrial areas in Durban and providing vital information to law enforcement as violent looting continues in the province. Picture: RUSA

DURBAN – The Zulu royal household is currently engaged in meetings to decide on steps to be taken to bring calm to the province.

This was revealed by royal spokesperson Prince Mbonisi Zulu during an interview with Independent Media.

Zulu said that as soon as a decision has been made, they would communicate it to the public.

“We are deeply saddened and hurt by the current incidents. I wish Mdlokombane (late King Goodwill Zwelithini Zulu) was still alive,” Zulu said. He added that the matters would not have gone this far if the late king was still alive.

“He had a way of dealing with people. When he spoke, his words stood and the people heeded his call.”

Meanwhile, Traditional Prime Minister Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi has urged President Cyril Ramaphosa to act decisively – and act now.

Buthelezi added that he knew the responsibility on Ramaphosa’s shoulders and pledged his support on any measures that would be taken to protect South Africa.

“But, I also know that if he does not act now, and act decisively, all will be lost,” Buthelezi said.

The current situation, he said, had become far bigger than politics.

“This is an internal war against ourselves, and South Africa cannot survive it. Ours was already a country on its knees. Such unchecked destruction will finish off any chance of recovery or economic survival,” he said.

South Africa, he said, could not afford a slow response, particularly in the presence of a devastating pandemic.

He added that while he recognised the constitutional right to protest, violent acts and destruction were not the solution.

“Tragically, the culture of violence is so deeply entrenched that our country is reaping the harvest of seeds sown decades ago.

“If there was any fear in acting against the perpetrators, that fear need to be set aside for the sake of us all.”

Buthelezi criticised the president’s use of the term “ethnic mobilisation”, saying this was not a war between Zulus and other ethnic groups.

He pointed out that even though Zuma is Zulu, those who supported him came from other provinces as well.

“I don’t see the meaning of the use of ethnic mobilisation.”

The Traditional Prime Minister commended the community of Ulundi, Phoenix and Umkomaas for standing up and defending their areas against looters.

“I appeal to our communities to stand up and defend us in this war against ourselves.”

Buthelezi added that some of the IFP leaders were guarding their towns day and night in co-operation with the police to curb looting and destruction of property.