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‘This is why I disinherited you’

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Mom’s chilling message from the grave.

Pretoria – A mother has, from her grave, told her daughter exactly why she had disinherited her and left all her earthly possessions to her two sons and granddaughter.

Elizabeth Oosthuizen, who died more than a year ago, wrote in her will: “My child, in life you never had any respect for me or any of my possessions. That is why you assaulted me, bad-mouthed me and lied and defrauded me.

“You have already swindled from me what you thought was due to you, without my permission. You know exactly what it is about. Good luck for the future.”

Oosthuizen’s last will and testament was the subject of an application before the Gauteng High Court, Pretoria, in which her two sons Cornelius Oosthuizen and Dirk Winterbach O’Neil asked the court to declare the testament their mother drew up and signed in 2013 to be her last will.

The brothers turned to court as they could not find the original 2013 will after her death, but only a signed copy of the document.

They cited their sister Tania Krantz as a respondent, as in terms of the previous will Krantz would have inherited her share of the estate.

The brothers said their mother and her second husband had drawn up a will in 1998 in terms of which all the children inherited. But the couple got divorced in 2010 and each party then drew up their own will in 2013.

Krantz did not oppose the application.

In terms of the 2013 will Krantz’s daughter will, among others, inherit her grandmother’s jewellery. But the deceased made it clear that these had to be put under lock and key and only be handed to her granddaughter on her 21st birthday.

Oosthuizen made it clear in her will that she did not want her daughter to, in any way, get her hands on the granddaughter’s inheritance.

The deceased was very precise in her will as to what she wanted done with her body and her possessions. She said she had a funeral policy at Clicks, which her children had to use for her cremation. Her car, a Fort Escort, immediately had to be sold to cover the estate’s costs.

She insisted that her ashes, after cremation, were to be placed in the grave of a specific family member.

Oosthuizen said any money which was due to her if her own elderly mother passed away, should go to her granddaughter. But this money had to be placed in a bank account until the now teenager reached the age of 25.

She firmly instructed her sons to ensure that their sister did not get her hands on any money due to the teenager. “She will try and swindle the child out of the money with her clever tricks, just as she did with me,” the deceased wrote. Apart from bequeathing her jewellery to her granddaughter, it did not appear as if the estate was worth a lot.

Pretoria News