Home South African Should SA parents be concerned over US baby formula crisis?

Should SA parents be concerned over US baby formula crisis?

282

As part of US President Joe Biden’s plan to solve the baby formula crisis, his team launched ’Operation Fly Formula’ to import infant formula from across Europe, with the first shipment having landed on Sunday.

Empty shelves show a shortage of baby formula at a store in San Antonio, Texas, US. Picture: Reuters/Kaylee Greenlee Beal

AS PART of US President Joe Biden’s plan to solve the baby formula crisis, his team launched ‘Operation Fly Formula’ to import infant formula from across Europe with the first shipment having landed on Sunday.

According to Al Jazeera, a military plane from Germany landed in Indianapolis, carrying 35 tons of baby formula, with more to arrive this week to help relieve the shortage.

The White House said 132 pallets on board were made up of Nestlé Health Science Alfamino Infant and Alfamino Junior formula, while an additional 114 pallets of Gerber Good Start Extensive HA formula is still expected to arrive.

Last week, the Biden administration invoked a wartime tool, the Defense Production Act, in an effort to address the nationwide shortage of baby formula.

Its use of the law, which Congress passed in the early days of the Korean War, reflects the magnitude of the supply crunch that has left many parents scrambling for formula.

The crisis stems from supply chain disruptions, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, which impacted a wide range of consumer goods. Meanwhile, a recall of formula produced at an Abbott plant, in Michigan, also exacerbated the shortfall.

The Washington Post reported that the majority of American parents and caregivers rely, at least partially, on a formula to feed their babies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Earlier this year, Abbott Nutrition recalled infant formula produced at its facility, which impacted South Africa, after reports of babies falling ill from bacterial infections.

According to the Business Insider, South Africans have no need to fear as production is said to be stable.

“In South Africa, we currently have enough stock to meet the current demand. We do not anticipate risks to supply in the near future,” Saint-Francis Tohlang, Nestlé’s corporate communications director for the East and Southern Africa region, told Business Insider SA.

Previous articleRussian diplomat resigns protesting Putin’s ’aggressive war’
Next articleSwiatek extends run at French Open as Osaka, Krejcikova bow out