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Mating seasons kicks off in Durban as two male black mambas caught fighting in a garden over female mamba

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One of two male black mambas who were caught fighting in a garden in Queensburgh were rescued on Sunday morning.

ONE of two male black mambas who were caught fighting in a garden in Queensburgh were rescued. Picture: Supplied

DURBAN – One of two male black mambas who were caught fighting in a garden in Queensburgh were rescued Sunday morning.

According to Durban snake catcher Nick Evans, this behaviour signalled that mamba mating season had officially kicked off in Durban.

According to Evans: “Two of my friends had the amazing privilege of watching two black mambas fighting in their garden. It is typical behaviour at this time of year two males fighting for a female, signalling the start of mating season.

“Their home is pretty much in Roosfontein, so venomous snakes are a regular occurrence. The mambas took their fight down a bank, and into the thick bush.

Evans said by the time he arrived the mambas were nowhere to be seen. He said two other snake catchers also joined him.

DURBAN snake catcher Nick Evans said the snake measured 2.55m. Picture: Supplied

“Just before leaving, we had one last look down the bank. Down the bank, up against the wall, something caught my eye. Sure enough, a mamba had returned. Its head was raised slightly off the ground, staring at us.

“To me, it looked like it was desperately hoping we couldn’t see it. But when we started to move, so did the snake.

“I ran down past the mamba, cutting off one escape route, while Warren came down in front of it. It was trying to hide behind a tree and an old plastic container. I managed to grab the tail, and then got the tongs on the neck. It put up a bit of a struggle, but I soon had it pinned down.”

Evans said the snake which measured 2.55m has been released into a nature reserve.

Evans wanted to remind us that even though it was mating season black mambas are not more aggressive.

“They’re their usual selves, scared of people.”

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