Home South African IEB matric pass rate shows slight increase to 98.39% despite Covid challenge

IEB matric pass rate shows slight increase to 98.39% despite Covid challenge

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The Class of 2021 has had to dig deep mentally and emotionally to find the strength to face the tremendous challenges of a radically changed teaching and learning environment of the last two years. They truly deserve the accolades they receive.”

File picture: Ian Landsberg/African News Agency (ANA)

INDEPENDENT schools have scored an improved pass rate for the Class of 2021 of 98.39%, slightly higher than last year’s 98.06%.

The release of the Independent Examinations Board (IEB) and National Senior Certificate (NSC) results showed that 89.2% of the cohort achieved entry to degree study, compared to 88.41% in 2020.

At least 7.82% qualified for entry to diploma study, compared to 8.14% in 2020, and 1.37% compared to 1.5% in 2020 achieved entry for study at a higher certificate level.

About 12,857 full-time and 968 part-time candidates from 238 examination centres wrote in 267 venues across southern Africa.

IEB chief executive officer Anne Oberholzer said that, as with an iceberg, the achievement of the Class of 2021 hid the depth of the struggle and effort that underpinned their success. “These Grade 12 learners were the true victims of Covid-19.

“The Class of 2021 has had to dig deep mentally and emotionally to find the strength to face the tremendous challenges of a radically changed teaching and learning environment of the last two years. They truly deserve the accolades they receive.”

Oberholzer said teaching in 2020 focused primarily on ensuring that Grade 12 pupils were given as much attention as possible to ensure they could succeed in their final examinations.

“Most Grade 11 learners in 2020 spent much less time at school and were essentially the test cases of the greatest online tuition experiment of our time.

“There’s no doubt that online learning cannot replace a good teacher in person. However, it is far better than no teacher and no guidance.

“If there is one good thing to come out of the pandemic, let it be the value that technology can bring to the classroom and particularly those children deprived of a quality education,” said Oberholzer.

Professor Nadine Petersen, UJ executive dean of the faculty of education, noted that in 2021 pupils also dealt with load shedding while they were making up for learner losses due to Covid-19.

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