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I got no cash from Guptas, I gambled to make extra money – Anoj Singh

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Former Transnet group chief financial officer Anoj Singh claim told the Zondo commission that he made extra cash by moonlighting as a financial consulting agent.

Former Transnet group chief financial officer Anoj Singh
Former Transnet group chief financial officer Anoj Singh gave evidence at the Zondo commission. Screengrab: SABC/YouTube

Johannesburg – Former Transnet group chief financial officer (GCFO) Anoj Singh claims that he made extra cash by moonlighting as a financial consulting agent. He also gambled a lot at casinos and participated in horse racing bets to make extra income for his family and for his own financial well-being.

“I did not get any money from the Guptas. I moonlighted while employed at Transnet. I had a lot of exposure due to my work and so people needed my services,” Singh said.

Singh made these revelations at the Commission of Inquiry into allegations of State Capture on Friday in his attempt to rebut the testimony of Witness 3 – who incriminated him in acts of state capture, including receiving large amounts of cash from the Guptas.

The identity of the witness could not be revealed for his own protection. He was attached to Singh as a driver and security guard from March 2014 until August 2016.

In his testimony, Witness 3 had earlier told the commission he took Singh to the Guptas at the Saxonwold compound more than 10 times.

“In more than six or seven of the visits to the Guptas houses, Mr Singh would come back from the meeting carrying a heavy sports bag. It looked like it contained cash in it. He would put the bag in the boot of the vehicle.

“Afterwards, he would ask me to drive him to Knox Vault in Killarney. At the vault, I would park the vehicle in the parking lot, while Singh would alight from the vehicle and remove the same bag from the boot,” Witness 3 said.

He said Singh would carry the bag with him to the vault box but would later return with it empty.

Witness 3 emphasised, in his testimony, that the same sequence of events happened on numerous occasions.

At the commission on Friday, Singh admitted that he owned four to five vault boxes at Knox Vault. He said he used the boxes to store important documents related to his work and family business, including depositing cash up to R100 000.

In his testimony, he denied ever asking Witness 3 to drive to Knox Vault or to the Guptas saying: “I would not use Witness 3 or any of Transnet resources for my private things.”

But Singh had difficulty to explain how Witness 3 knew about the vault box and its location in Killarney.

Adding to his troubles – both Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo – who heads the commission – and evidence leader Advocate Anton Myburgh also remarked about the coincidences in their testimony.

In his remark, Singh said Witness 3 might have been made aware by the commission’s investigators or some of the employees of Transnet who allegedly wanted to implicate him in allegations of state capture.

“Witness 3 was spoon-fed. This is my assertion. His entire version is a fabrication. The commission investigators knew that a lot of individuals had boxes at Knox Vault,” Singh said.

Asked where he got the money to deposit cash in the boxes, Singh said: “I got the cash through family business. I usually also gambled at casinos and horse racing. I also did some consulting work as a financial consultant. Yes I moonlighted for cash. People who knew about my exposure contacted me as they needed my services,” Singh said.

The hearing continues.

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Political Bureau