Home South African Four suspected poachers arrested over Inverdoorn rhino ’massacre’

Four suspected poachers arrested over Inverdoorn rhino ’massacre’

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Four suspects are expected to appear in court on Monday on poaching-related charges following the massacre of four Inverdoorn rhinos last week.

Four rhinos, including a pregnant female, were found killed at Inverdoorn Private Game Reserve near Cape Town. picture: Supplied

CAPE TOWN – Four suspects are expected to appear in the Ceres Magistrate’s Court on Monday on poaching-related charges following the massacre of four Inverdoorn rhinos last week.

Police spokesperson Colonel André Traut said the four, aged between 27 and 56, are expected to make their first appearance in Ceres on Monday morning following their arrests at the weekend.

Two of the suspects are also facing charges relating to the Immigration Act.

“It is suspected that the suspects are responsible for the death of four rhinos and the injury caused to a fifth one on December 8 on a game reserve in Ceres. The investigation is still under way and the finer aspects thereof cannot be disclosed at this premature stage,” Traut said.

Inverdoorn Private Game Reserve owner Searl Derman said that the police, Cape Nature, forensic investigator Wayne Stoltz – who was instrumental in solving the 2011 Aquila poaching incident – private investigators and a polygraph team of TP Services have worked around the clock since the first notification of the incident last Wednesday night.

“We have been made aware of the arrests very shortly after the crime, and although we have made reference to positive and exciting developments, we were not in a position to make announcements in fear of it handicapping the investigation,” Derman said.

“We are hoping that there is enough evidence and that the court does not release them or grant them bail. Everyone continues to work day and night to solidify their case and to bring all the perpetrators to justice,” Derman added.

The surviving female Inverdoorn rhino.

Meanwhile, the surviving female Inverdoorn rhino has been darted and, according to the senior vet, Louis Greeff, “she is strong and they have inserted a drip”. Her carers will now assess the injuries and decide on the best possible way forward.

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