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Give new NPA boss room to manoeuvre

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The new NPA boss must be given adequate resources to be able to operate independently and to carry out investigations

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WHOEVER is appointed National Director of Public Prosecutions will have to deal with the rampant factionalism that has taken hold of a once-credible institution and the financial and staff crisis it is facing.

For the five shortlisted candidates, this will surely be one of the toughest challenges of their careers thus far.

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) is tasked with investigating money laundering, illicit financial flows, collusive behaviour and organised crime – yet it has been inefficient in dealing with these crimes, which have undermined public trust in the government and the political systems.

The formation of cliques in the NPA – their existence has been denied but it is apparent that they exist -has to an extent protected those who should be taken to task for corruption.

The prosecution authority is meant to be quasi-independent, but for far too long those who have influence and power have ensured it has had limited independence and that it has been used in the battle for political power in South Africa.

The new NPA boss must be given adequate resources to be able to operate independently and to carry out investigations. This is the only way to stop the scourge of public and private sector corruption.