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WHY MY SHOE WAS ON ROOF

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“I wanted to inform the police about what Marais had told me about the woman and child who were found in the veld. I wanted the police to get Marais off my back and stop bothering me.”

MURDER accused Michael Pieterson, who was arrested after an All Star takkie and clothes with possible blood stains were seized from his house as evidence, explained that he had washed his takkies and had placed them on the roof of his shanty to dry.

The shoe print of the All Star takkie was similar to a print that was found at the crime scene in Windsorton on May 12.

Pieterson was charged with the murder of his ex-girlfriend, Kantse Mokgele, and their 11-month-old son, Neo Elias Mokgele, and burning and concealing their bodies, which were hidden in the veld.

Testifying in the Northern Cape High Court yesterday, Pieterson indicated that he owned three pairs of All Star takkies and that he had informed the police about the takkie that was on the roof.

He also complained that he was assaulted and manhandled by the police after they confiscated clothes and the takkie from his shanty.

“Captain Seeley slapped me twice. I sat on the sofa. By that stage I was already handcuffed, where they informed me I was arrested for murder. I was not told my rights before I was taken into the police van.”

Pieterson added that his hands were “violently” held behind his back after he was handcuffed and marched to his shack for the search and seizure operation.

“The community could see how I was treated. My hands were stiffly held behind my back. I could see from Captain Seeley’s expression that he was very serious and angry and told me that if I did not tell the truth, he would kill me. I was threatened in the presence of other police officers. Inside the shack I was told to sit in the corner in a manner that was not good “

Pieterson explained that he had called the police on May 12, after the deceased’s aunt, Eva Marais, had questioned him that morning regarding the whereabouts of the deceased.

“I didn’t know what she was talking about and did not make any connection regarding the two incidents. I told her that I had left Kantse at her house the previous evening and did not know where she was.”

Pieterson explained that he had later that day visited Marais’ home after he saw a police bakkie parked outside her house.

“I wanted to inform the police about what Marais had told me about the woman and child who were found in the veld. I wanted the police to get Marais off my back and stop bothering me.”

He added that he was prepared to co-operate with the police if they needed his help in finding the missing persons. “I had nothing to do with their deaths.”

Pieterson stated that he would not have stopped the police from searching his shack if he had been asked for permission.

“If they had asked me, I would have said ‘yes’, but I was never asked. I was sober minded at the time. Seeley told me that my clothes were full of blood and I said it was not blood.”

The case continues.