Home News Sanral empowers SMMEs in JTG District

Sanral empowers SMMEs in JTG District

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With the aim of ensuring that small and upcoming businesses are profitable and sustainable, the South African National Roads Agency SOC Ltd hosted a Small, Medium and Macro Enterprise (SMME) Information Session in Mothibistad, Kuruman. During the session, business owners were encouraged to prepare to participate and benefit economically from two separate routine road maintenance projects that will be launched in the area soon.

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WITH the aim of ensuring that small and upcoming businesses are profitable and sustainable, the South African National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (Sanral) hosted a Small, Medium and Macro Enterprise (SMME) Information Session in Mothibistad, Kuruman. During the session, business owners were encouraged to prepare to participate and benefit economically from two separate routine road maintenance (RRM) projects that will be launched in the area soon.

The two projects are both slated to be multimillion-rand projects that will focus on repairing and maintaining the road network in the JTG District.

According to Sanral project manager Rudi Joubert, the two projects will span several hundred kilometres in the area.

“The first of the two projects runs between Olifantshoek, through to Kathu, Kuruman and up until the Northern Cape and North West border. The total length of that project is approximately 250 kilometres. The second project is centred around Kuruman. The project starts halfway between Danielskuil and Kuruman. It starts in Danielskuil and runs north through Kuruman, past Hotazel and continues to the Botswana border,” explained Joubert.

He added that these projects will have a significant economic impact on small businesses.

“We have allowed more work to be done on these two projects. The estimate of the value of the work will be determined by the tenders submitted. We are currently busy with the evaluation of the tenders submitted. However, the scope of the work is expected to be several million rand. The project will run for the next five years.”

Joubert said they are currently busy with the evaluation of the main contractor.

“The projects are envisioned to start in either August or September … or even October. The commencement date is dependent on when the tender process is concluded. Both projects were evaluated in parallel so the appointment of the contractor and the starting date for the two projects will also be at the same time.”

Joubert said the projects are solely based on the maintenance of roads.

“We will not be constructing any new roads. Both projects will solely be focussed on routine road maintenance. The work will include maintenance of the current roads in order for them not to deteriorate over time. If there is a pothole, it will be fixed and if there are cracks, they will be sealed.

“The biggest enemy to a road is water, so if the rainwater seeps into the pavement layers, the deterioration of the pavement layer increases exponentially. That would be one of the primary duties that will be conducted on these two projects.

“Off-the-road work will, among others, include grass cutting, removal of trees, culvert cleaning, clearing of litter at rest areas and keeping the area between the road reserve and the fences clean.”

Joubert added that a contractor is yet to be appointed.

“Last year we appointed a consultant on one of the projects. Generally how our tender process works is that we will advertise for a consultant and thereafter the appointed consultant will conduct a site assessment. They will draft the tender document for the contractor and the bill of quantities including the pricing schedule. On both of the projects the contractors are being evaluated.”

The subcontractor packages will be determined by the contractor.

“Sanral will appoint the two main contractors for the project, and the main contractors will then start the subcontractor process. Those packages will then be presented to the consultant contractor of Sanral. The appointment of a subcontractor is generally six months after the contractor is appointed. The appointment of the subcontractors is expected to commence early next year,” Joubert said.

Small business owners who attended the sessions said they were very informative.

“Sometimes we do not see or are not informed about upcoming projects where local upcoming and small businesses can benefit from. At times one would just see people were hired on a project, but there was never information communicated,” they said.

Twenty-seven-year-old Tumisang Pampoen, who owns Ladotech Engineering, said he is glad that there are possible opportunities for black youth-owned businesses on the two projects

‘My experience as a young business owner is that the youth are at times side-lined from business opportunities as some contractors want to only employ established companies who have experience. The lack of experience in a field can lead to youth-owned businesses never gaining any experience in order to be recognised as established businesses.

“We are anticipating that these projects will result in profit for businesses, but also in much-needed experience for those who might have never had an opportunity to participate in road maintenance projects,” said Pampoen.

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