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Questions asked over broken weighbridge

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It was, however, reported that the appointed candidate was still struggling to perform his duties after the training, while he did not complete the additional training that was recommended

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THE WEIGHBRIDGE at the Kimberley landfill site has not been working for more than a year, breaking just weeks after being installed.

Sol Plaatje municipal spokesperson, Sello Matsie, confirmed recently that the weighbridge was not working, adding that the process was under way to get it repaired.

According to a member of the public, the weighbridge at the landfill site broke shortly after it was installed.

It is believed that a heavily overloaded truck caused the weighbridge to come off its rails, damaging the computer system.

“This was more than a year ago. However, now that it is no longer under guarantee, the municipality has suddenly woken up and wants to repair the weighbridge,” the member of the public said.

He questioned how much the weighbridge cost and why no effort had been made by the official responsible to get it fixed while it was still under guarantee.

“It seems like the official responsible failed to do anything about the issue until it was too late and it is no longer under guarantee.”

Matsie did not respond to these questions.

It is believed that the faulty weighbridge was reported to the project manager and the company that installed the equipment was contacted but it was unable to get hold of the project manager.

It is estimated that the damage to the weighbridge is around a million rand.

A visit to the landfill site yesterday revealed that while the weighbridge is not functioning, there is an employee on duty to operate it. The employee was sitting in his car when the DFA arrived.

The R28 million upgraded landfill site was opened in October last year by the then executive mayor of Kimberley.

The work undertaken included the construction of new Clearvu security fencing, the construction of a guard-house, with a boom and sliding gate for access control, new paved access and internal roads, including parking facilities, two weighbridges, a new ablution facility, the construction of a new administration building, a security-fenced recycling facility and tyre storage facility, a garden refuse area, bulk civil services and electrical supply.

Yesterday the recycling facility was also empty and it appears that it is not being utilised.

The upgrade was aimed at improving security, curbing criminal activity and allowing community members to process recyclable materials.

The municipality said at the time that it expected that the upgrades and increased security would help curb the widespread problem of illegal dumping in Kimberley.

The aim of the weighbridge is to not only charge people for large-scale dumping, but also to allow for the recording of waste volumes.