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PARK REVAMPED

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“Planting more trees is also expected to direct attention towards reducing pollution, control erosion, create a habitat to promote biodiversity and contribute to household food security”

The once notorious Hulana Park in Kimberley has been turned into a family facility after the Sol Plaatje Municipality revamped it for the community.

The park now has braai areas, refurbished playground equipment, garden chairs and verandas, a fence, a new irrigation system and grass.

Revamping of the park was announced in the 2017/18 financial year . . . and the municipality aims to take it “one park at a time”.

Another two parks – one in John Daka and the other in Entrance Route (opposite Galeshewe Day Hospital) – are due for and upgrade.

The decision to revamp the park in Hulana Street follows complaints from the community that it has been turned into a dumping site and a crime hot spot.

According to residents, young people were using the park as a drinking area, where broken and empty bottles were often left in the road.

Members of the Ethiopian Episcopal Church, situated next to the park, also said that drunk people often jumped over the fence to use their toilets.

The revamped park will officially be opened by the mayor today. He will plant several trees in an effort to raise awareness about preserving the green heritage and also to promote the beauty of the city of Kimberley.

Mayor Patrick Mabilo urged residents and stakeholders to take responsibility and play their role in greening and cleaning their gardens, parks and streets to leave a lasting impact on the environment.

“Planting more trees is also expected to direct attention towards reducing pollution, control erosion, create a habitat to promote biodiversity and contribute to household food security,” Mabilo said.

A community member, Tumelo Mosikare, who has been observing the transformation of the park, applauded the municipality and called for the process of revamping parks to be extended to other wards.

Mosikare encouraged the people who stay in the vicinity of the parks to protect them and prevent people from destroying them. According to him, using unemployed community members and ward councillors in these programmes will be a definite win to beautifying the city.

“It is very impressive to see such a beautiful park in the heart of Galeshewe, but I hope it can be maintained, just like the one in Club 2000. The park in Club 2000 is being maintained by community members who do not get paid.”

He further applaud the municipality for providing a fence for the Galeshewe swimming pool.