Home News MEC warns of rising water levels in Vaal, Orange river systems

MEC warns of rising water levels in Vaal, Orange river systems

371
SHARE

“The provincial disaster teams and district and local authorities are on high alert and have put measures in place to avoid the loss of human life, livestock or damage to property.”

A row of trees on the banks of the Vaal River. Picture: Karen Sandison/African News Agency (ANA)

THE NORTHERN Cape MEC for Agriculture, Environmental Affairs, Land Reform and Rural Development, Mase Manopole, has cautioned farmers and farmworkers residing along the Vaal and Orange rivers to be careful and to heed the flood alert warnings issued by the Department of Water and Sanitation.

Department spokesperson Zandisile Luphahla said that heavy rains in the Province have resulted in an increase in the water levels of the two rivers and urged residents to be cautious during this time.

“The provincial disaster teams and district and local authorities are on high alert and have put measures in place to avoid the loss of human life, livestock or damage to property,” said Luphahla on Friday.

“The flood alert warning informs communities of the continuing increase of water levels due to heavy rains in the Vaal and Orange river systems. It further warns the community to avoid swimming in the nearby streams, as this could lead to possible drowning.”

Luphahla said that while the rain is most welcome, residents in the Province should practise some caution.

“The seasonal rainfall forecasts show that there is a high likelihood of above-normal rainfall over the Northern Cape, which is favourable for the agricultural sector. MEC Manopole has welcomed the rains, especially in the drought-stricken regions, such as the ZF Mgcawu, Namakwa and Pixley ka Seme districts.

“However, we call on farmers and game farmers in the Namakwa and ZF Mgcawu regions to abide by the flood alert warnings by removing livestock, water pumps and agricultural equipment, in order to avoid damage to their goods. That equipment can be damaged by flooding if left unattended and that would hamper food production.

“We further advice communities and farmers across the Province to practise rainwater harvesting methods such as rain barrels, cistern installation and creation of rain water gardens for future usage,” said Luphahla.