Home News ‘Land expropriation the biggest threat’

‘Land expropriation the biggest threat’

101
SHARE

“The impact of persistent drought conditions is also exacerbated by local government’s failure to make any provision for disasters.”

File picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency (ANA)

DA MPL Boitumelo Babuseng warned that the expropriation of land without compensation posed the biggest threat to the agricultural sector and food security.

During the presentation of the Department of Agriculture and Land Reform’s budget speech on Tuesday, Babuseng pointed out that land reform was bound to fail due to a “basic lack of will to see it succeed”.

“This failure is now being used to support the ANC’s flawed argument that constitutional change, that will see property rights revoked, is needed to successfully pursue land reform.

“It is undeniable that patterns of land ownership remain intolerably skewed. This, however, has nothing to do with the constitution. Instead, the constitution is just a smokescreen for the ANC’s own land reform failure

“The expropriation of land without compensation is also the biggest current day obstruction to our democracy and the biggest possible affront to our human dignity.”

Babuseng added that the management of the large majority of commonage land under the control of municipalities was “chaotic and uncoordinated at best”.

“The impact of persistent drought conditions is also exacerbated by local government’s failure to make any provision for disasters.”

He said that inadequate support and extension services has resulted in the decline in farm productivity in countless projects where beneficiaries were unable to improve their socio-economic conditions and livelihoods.

“Surely this lack of support could, to a large degree, have been prevented if more care was taken to invest more prudently in beneficiary support, rather than grandstanding.”

Babuseng pointed out that
R70 million had been transferred to the National Agricultural Marketing Council for the vineyard development project.

“Delays in the transfer of land to beneficiaries and the issuing of title deeds, as well as corruption by government officials, are also to blame.

“Title deeds are withheld from emerging farmers, forcing them to lease land from government. This in turn inhibits farmers from approaching financial institutions such as banks, buying a vehicle or purchasing feed for the animals.”