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Funeral service for son of city

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The former Kimberley mayor died earlier this week at the age of 103, having made a substantial impact on the city and its residents over more than half a century.

Lawrie Shuttleworth.

THE FUNERAL service for prominent city resident Lawrie Shuttleworth will take place at St Cyprian’s Cathedral at 11am tomorrow morning.

The former Kimberley mayor died earlier this week at the age of 103, having made a substantial impact on the city and its residents over more than half a century.

Born in Johannesburg in November 1914, Shuttleworth was the third of seven brothers.

He completed his BCom Degree at Rhodes University in 1935 before joining the South African Air Force’s No12 Squadron in 1939.

When war broke out, Shuttleworth was called up for active duty, serving in the East African campaign flying mainly army close support sorties including reconnaissance and bombing missions.

During his time as a pilot, he was shot down on more than one occasion before returning to South Africa as a Lieutenant-Colonel, to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

In 1948, Shuttleworth arrived in Kimberley with his wife, Claudia, their daughters, Patricia and Jennifer, and their son, Anthony, where he spent the rest of his life contributing to the city and the community.

He was inducted into the Kimberley Rotary Club in 1952 and was elected president six years later. This was a position that sparked his interest in public affairs and he served on the Kimberley City Council for 26 years from 1968 to 1994 and was the mayor of the city from 1972 to 1974.

During his term of office he bestowed the Freedom of the City on the late Harry Oppenheimer.

The tram service from the Big Hole and the lemon trees on the pavements of Kimberley were initiated by Shuttleworth, who was also responsible for the establishment of the Youth Hostel (Gum Tree Lodge) in the city.

“Through my association with Rotary and the city council, I felt that affordable accommodation was necessary to attract tourists to the city.”

Shuttleworth played a prominent role in the promotion of the Diamond City as a tourist attraction. The Kimberley Publicity Association bestowed a life-time achievement award on him for his contribution to tourism.

Shuttleworth was also instrumental in saving the City Hall from demolition and erecting the Pioneers of Aviation museum.

He was invited by Mark Shuttleworth, his brother’s grandson, to go to Russia to witness the launch of the first African into space. Mark’s father (Richard) attended Kimberley Boys’ High School and virtually grew up in his uncle’s home.