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City matriculant receives top Girl Guide award

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Ugashnie embraced her guiding experience and ended it on a high note by completing the very challenging Protea Award.

A Kimberley 2018 matriculant, Ugashnie Pearce, was recently presented her Protea Award, the highest award a ranger can achieve in the guiding movement. Kimberley Girl Guides District Commissioner, Alison Nel, presented the award to Ugashnie, who is only the second recipient of the award in the Northern Cape. Picture: Supplied

A Kimberley 2018 matriculant, Ugashnie Pearce, was recently presented her Protea Award, the highest award a ranger can achieve in the guiding movement.

Pearce is only the second recipient of the award in the Northern Cape, the first being awarded to Chloe Eascott last year.

Kimberley Girl Guides district commissioner Alison Nel, who presented the award to Ugashnie, explained that in Rangers there were eight different adventures, such as leadership, outdoors and community service.

“A ranger needs to complete eight clauses from each adventure to reach level four. Previously this was known as a Diamond Award. To get the Protea Award, however, the recipient needs to do an additional clause in each adventure, so 72 clauses in all! She is also required to complete a service project, plan and organise a regional event, gain the ranger camp permit and hold a peer education training,” said Nel.

“In addition, the recipient is also expected to give an oral presentation about her guiding path to a non-guiding audience, attend a panel interview and provide feedback to the relevant parties on her experience of the ranger programme and lastly to submit a portfolio of all the clauses, activities and planning done throughout her guiding journey. Rangers is started in Grade 9 so the recipient has only four years to achieve all of this.”

Ugashnie started Guides in 2011 as a shy, quiet, polite young girl, who came with her cousins.

“Today she has become a young lady with an inner core of self-confidence, a love for the outdoors, compassion towards those less fortunate and someone who will stand up for her own beliefs and injustices towards others.

“She is a young lady who knows how to, amongst other things, work with a drill, change a car’s tyre or jump-start it, who knows how to cook successfully in more than one way in the outdoors, put up a tent, make a flag pole and hoist a flag,” Nel said.

“She knows how to run a committee and chair a meeting, she knows the importance of working in a team and how each individual has their own strengths and weaknesses.

“She knows about carbon footprints and how important it is that we look after our planet, about healthy and unhealthy eating habits, about substance abuse and peer pressure. She knows basic first aid and self defence. She also knows how to change a light bulb and wire a plug, how to light a campfire and work with gas.

“She knows a lot about the World Wide Girl Guiding Organisation and how it enhances girls and women. She also knows without a doubt that she can find her way by means of a compass and is not afraid to walk 15km in the veld in the dark with a heavy backpack.”

In conclusion, Nel pointed out that Ugashnie embraced her guiding experience and ended it on a high note by completing the very challenging Protea Award.

“The most valuable lesson I have learnt is that not everyone is meant to be the patrol leader because some of us are more valued as a helping hand and supporter to our leader when they need us. I have learnt that it is very important to speak your mind and stand up for your beliefs and the beliefs of others. I have also learnt the importance of lending a hand whenever and wherever you go and to embrace who and what you really are,” Ugashnie said regarding her achievement.

– Staff Reporter