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City crime-fighter assists job seekers

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A beloved Kimberley resident and community crime-fighter, Pantsi Obusitse, opened his heart to unemployed residents when he took it upon himself to deliver hundreds of job applications to the Northern Cape Department of Education.

Tebogo Obusitse, who collected 375 CVs from job seekers in Galeshewe, made sure they were all placed in the collection box at the District Department of Education. Picture: Soraya Crowie

A BELOVED Kimberley resident and community crime-fighter, Pantsi Obusitse, opened his heart to unemployed residents when he took it upon himself to deliver hundreds of job applications to the Northern Cape Department of Education.

Obusitse recently delivered about 450 job applications for various advertised posts at the department.

He said he realised that job hunting was a costly process when someone is unemployed.

“It is easy for someone who is employed to tell someone that is not working to go look for a job or to apply for a certain job. However, what we tend to forget is that even when applying for a job, there are costs attached.

“During this application process, I saw the long distances people had to travel in order to get to the district offices of the department in Hadison Park in order to deliver their applications. The delivery of these applications was costly as many travelled from areas such as Galeshewe and Roodepan and even Platfontein.

“They had to take two taxis in order to just get closer to the district office. Thereafter they had to proceed further on foot as there are no taxis to the district office. Imagine if you do not have the taxi fare to just deliver your job application and to get back home again. There are vacant posts for positions in Platfontein. Imagine how the people in that area will struggle to deliver their applications as they are staying outside the city.

“Also, what I witnessed as I collected the applications was that there were some people who reached out to me and indicated that they do not have a curriculum vitae (CV) or a Z83 form required to apply for the jobs. I then printed almost 200 Z83 forms and people were so grateful for that.

“These struggles may seem minuscule, but it can seem like a mountain that is standing in your way when you are trying to secure a job.”

Obusitse said he made use of social media to spread the message of him collecting and delivering CVs for posts at the Education Department.

“I posted on my Facebook account the various pick-up points that I would be at. There were so many people who were waiting for me at the various pick-up points. People were very grateful for the initiative.”

He pointed out that his initiative is not a call for other residents to do the same thing.

“We all have our own strengths, gifts and capabilities. This is not a call for other residents to do the same thing. I have merely identified a need in our communities and decided to assist where I could.

“I am an employee at the department and saw it as no hassle to just pick up the CVs and get them delivered. Other residents might be assisting in other ways that I am not aware of or may not be able to do. We all have our own individual strengths and not everyone might be able to go around and collect CVs in order to deliver them.

“Also, there might be some people who might use this opportunity to take advantage of others’ plight.

“It is of no use to be driving around with people’s job applications because you were trying to do a good deed. It has to be a selfless act. However, if it is in your heart to help your fellow men, then do so. There are various ways we can make a difference in someone’s life.”

Obusitse also noted that some of the applicants had confused his role.

“I went around to collect the applications and some people were under the impression that I was the one who did the selection of the candidates to employ. I merely collected the CVs to drop off at the office and I am not involved in who gets the job in the end. My role did not involve them getting the job but just getting their applications to the right people.”

He added that he has seen the impact that unemployment has on crime.

“This gesture also forms part of residents fighting and rooting out crime. We all know that those who are unemployed and desperate later end up conducting criminal activities in order to meet their daily expenses. People are desperate for employment and we need to spark hope in each other by helping to alleviate the plight of those in need.”

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