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Cancer Project launched in NC

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Prostate, oesophageal, colo-rectal and liver cancers were the other leading causes of cancer death for South African men

LAUNCH: The 2018 Northern Cape Cancer Project was launched at the Galeshewe Recreation Hall yesterday.

IN AN EFFORT to limit the detrimental impact of cancer, through early detection and public education, the Northern Cape Department of Health and various stakeholders in health care launched the Cancer Project, an initiative aimed at improving oncology services in the Province while promoting regular testing.

Yesterday’s event at the Galeshewe Recreation Hall saw the official unveiling of this collaboration between provincial government and the Cancer Charity Workers (CCW), offering free screenings, care and support to residents while encouraging them to undergo regular follow-up examinations in order to prevent the disease from spreading through early detection.

The CCW is a non-profit organisation based in Kuruman, with a specific focus on the various forms of this disease, particularly lung cancer. It is funded by the American pharmaceutical company, Bristol-Myers Squibb.

According to the Department of Health, new incidences of cancer have quadrupled in the last 10 years in the Northern Cape, with the disease threatening to overtake HIV as the leading cause of death in the Province.

Lung, cervical and oesophageal cancer are the deadliest forms in South Africa, accounting for nearly 20 000 deaths in 2015 alone, according to an analysis of 32 cancer groups in 195 countries or territories.

The same analysis indicated that cancer mortality increased in more than 50 countries, most of which are in sub-Saharan Africa, in the decade ending 2015, where the health services needed to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer are often missing.

Breast cancer is the most common form among South African women, but cervical cancer is the deadliest.

For men, prostate cancer resulted in the highest number of new cases, but lung cancer was the number one killer.

Prostate, oesophageal, colo-rectal and liver cancers were the other leading causes of cancer death for South African men.