Home News Bid to silence Die Stem

Bid to silence Die Stem

444
SHARE

“Whenever they play the song, it hurts my feelings. It reminds me of the pain and suffering that I had to endure under the evil apartheid government. I want that chapter of South African history to be closed so that healing can begin.”

File photo: Elmond Jiyane

A CITY resident has opened a case of crimen injuria and violation of his constitutional rights, where he believes that the Afrikaans section of the national anthem amounts to hate speech and should be abolished.

Job Mogorosi, who lodged the complaint, also intends referring the matter to the Equality Court, following an Equality Court ruling that found that flying the old South African flag was a form of hate speech.

In an affidavit, Mogorosi pointed out that the Afrikaans section of the national anthem “celebrated apartheid and the enslavement of the African majority”.

“Whenever they play the song, it hurts my feelings. It reminds me of the pain and suffering that I had to endure under the evil apartheid government. I want that chapter of South African history to be closed so that healing can begin.”

Mogorosi believes that charges should be brought against Parliament, the President of the Republic of South Africa and the national Speaker of Parliament.

“These three institutions are responsible for the adoption and legislation of the national anthem.”

Mogorosi stated that the old South African flag and the Afrikaans section of the national anthem are a symbol of oppression.

“It reminds the nation of the rape of natural resources and wealth of our continent and the superiority complex of the colonial masters.”

Petition

Spokesperson for Parliament Manelisi Wolela stated yesterday that Parliament’s doors were always open to any individual or group wishing to make a submission or petition on any matter that falls within the realm of its mandate.

“We will consider such and give an appropriate response.”

This follows an Equality Court ruling that found that displaying the old South African flag constituted hate speech.

The deputy judge president of the Gauteng High Court in Johannesburg, Phineas Mojapelo, last month ruled that displaying the flag in homes and schools was “equally unacceptable, offensive and hurtful … was discriminatory and demonstrated a clear intention to be hurtful, harmful and and incited harm and promoted and propagated hatred”.

In his judgment Mojapelo said that “waving the apartheid flag served to incite and awaken feelings of white supremacy against black people”.

He stated that the flag could only be used for “information, artistic creativity, academic and scientific inquiry, journalism and if it was in the public interest”.