Home Lifestyle Yoghurt reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes, the FDA confirms

Yoghurt reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes, the FDA confirms

187

The announcement from the FDA has been met with enthusiasm, prompting health advocates to recommend yoghurt as a staple in South African diets. This recommendation aims not only to tackle Type 2 diabetes but to foster overall holistic health improvements.

Yoghurt. Picture: Pexels/Any Lane

THE FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in the United States has recently made an announcement that could be good news for yoghurt lovers.

They say that having yoghurt regularly – at least two cups every week – might help reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. This claim is based on some scientific research, though the evidence is considered to be limited at this stage.

Danone, a major player in the yoghurt market, is thrilled with this announcement. “It’s a big step forward for yoghurt and all fermented dairy products,” said Leanne Keizer, who works as a registered dietitian and is also head of corporate affairs at Danone Southern Africa.

According to Keizer, Danone’s goal has always been to promote health through food, especially dairy products that contain live cultures. The company has been committed to teaching people about the advantages of adding yoghurt to their diet.

This new endorsement from the FDA proves that there are real benefits to eating yoghurt, Keizer added.

In South Africa, a striking 12% of adults are grappling with diabetes, imposing a significant financial burden on the nation’s healthcare system, with costs soaring to R2.7 billion.

A study conducted in 2023 sheds light on the situation, revealing that of the estimated 4.58 million South Africans aged between 20 and 79 who were living with diabetes in 2019, more than half, precisely 52.4%, were unaware of their condition.

This indicates a large gap in diagnosis and awareness among the population.

South Africa is ranking second in sub-Saharan Africa for the number of individuals suffering from Type 2 diabetes. Picture: Vlad Chețan/Pexels

Furthermore, a report from the National Library of Medicine positions South Africa as ranking second in sub-Saharan Africa for the number of individuals suffering from Type 2 diabetes.

This particular form of diabetes is closely tied to lifestyle choices, including one’s diet and overall nutrition. This underscores the critical need for lifestyle changes and increased awareness as key strategies in managing and potentially reducing the diabetes epidemic within the country.

“South Africa is enduring a severe food crisis where countless households struggle to afford what is considered a minimum, acceptable, nutritious diet.

Yoghurt is an accessible, nutrient-dense food which provides essential daily nutrition, live cultures to promote gut health, and is associated with decreased risk of developing chronic diseases of lifestyle such as obesity and Type 2 diabetes,” added Keizer.

“To demonstrate the possibility of choosing affordable, nutritious foods, consider a small tub of yoghurt, which costs around R3.80 per 100g serving compared to a single serving packet of crisps which costs around R6.00. Not only does the yoghurt offer a more cost-effective choice, but it also offers exponentially more value from a nutrition perspective.

A newly released report highlights the multiple health benefits of incorporating yoghurt into the daily diet, emphasising its role in meeting essential nutrient needs, including protein and calcium.

Experts point out that regular yoghurt consumption is key to enhancing gut health, thanks to the live cultures it contains.

This, in turn, is linked to significant long-term health advantages, such as improved digestion, a stronger immune system, and decreased likelihood of weight gain and chronic illnesses, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

“Individuals including yoghurt in their diets regularly tend to have a higher quality of diet, engage more in physical activities, drink less alcohol, and are less prone to smoking,” stated Keizer, shedding light on the broader lifestyle choices of yoghurt consumers.

The announcement from the FDA has been met with enthusiasm, prompting health advocates to recommend yoghurt as a staple in South African diets. This recommendation aims not only to tackle Type 2 diabetes but to foster overall holistic health improvements.

“It all comes down to making conscious decisions that consider the nutrient density of a food choice when weighing up its value. With this mindset, eating healthily is accessible to everyone. Your gut, improved immunity, and overall health will thank you,” said Keizer.

Here are various ways to make yoghurt a part of your daily meals and snacks:

Dips and Sauces

Mix yoghurt with herbs and spices to create dips for vegetables, pita bread or chips. Use it as a base for sauces to drizzle over dishes like grilled chicken, fish or vegetables.

Dressings

Whisk yoghurt with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper to create a creamy salad dressing. You can also add herbs and mustard for extra flavour.

Frozen treats

Freeze yoghurt with fruits or honey to make home-made frozen yoghurt. You can also pour the mixture into popsicle moulds for a healthy, icy snack.

Baking

Substitute yoghurt for oil or butter in muffins, cakes, and bread recipes to add moisture and reduce fat. It also works well in pancake and waffle batters.

Cooking

Use yoghurt to tenderise meats in marinades or add it to soups and curries for creaminess, without the heavy cream.

Previous articleCold cases: 3,400 unclaimed bodies in state mortuaries
Next articleHilary Swank says quitting Hollywood to care for dad was a ‘blessing’