Home Lifestyle ‘This is in bad taste’: Nando’s reacts to fake ad about Thabo...

‘This is in bad taste’: Nando’s reacts to fake ad about Thabo Bester and Dr Nandipha Magudumana

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The fast-food restaurant has since distanced itself from the advert.

Nando’s reacts to fake ad about Thabo Bester and Dr Nandipha Magudumana. Picture: Nando’s

NANDO’S is known for its hilariously controversial videos and memes, but it has come to light that not every funny banner by the ‘restaurant’ is theirs.

This comes after a fake Nando’s banner was created which mocks Thabo Bester and Dr. Nandipha Magudumana.

Shared on Twitter by @D_Bhekza it was written: “imnandi-pha-Chicken-Magudumana. The Bester way”.

With over 200,000 views and over 3,000 likes since the time of publication, the post has since gone viral.

The fast-food restaurant has since distanced itself from the advert. In reply to the tweet by @D_Bhekza, they said the advert is in bad taste and is in no way aligned with their brand and values.

“Whilst we value the enthusiasm of fans for our brand, we don’t appreciate the production of these fake ads/parody accounts. This is in bad taste and is in no way aligned to our brand or values. And remember, if it’s not on our page, it’s not ours. @NandosSA is our official page.”

Users flooded the comment section.

One user wrote: “Take credit manando ifana nawe lendaba (take credit Nando’s, this looks like you).”

A second user asked: “Where does it say “Nandos” on the picture?” While a third also jokingly questioned, “For all the unhinged ads you guys have had in the past this is where you draw the line?”

The restaurant has always been known to jump on almost every trending topic on social media and turn it into an ad joke, but ever since the Thabo Bester and Dr Nandipha Magudumana saga started they have been mum about it. I guess it is true when people say “Not everything should be turned into a joke”.

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