Home Lifestyle ‘Adele Presents: Coming to Africa’ concert was a scam

‘Adele Presents: Coming to Africa’ concert was a scam

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The fraudulent event was listed on Computicket Box Office, a self-service platform launched in 2022 for smaller event organizers.

Adele. Picture: Instagram

FANS of internationally-renowned superstar Adele were devastated to learn that her highly-anticipated African concert was a scam.

However, the red flags for the “Adele Presents: Coming to Africa” concert in September were apparent.

This included the suspiciously low ticket price of R89 on the Computicket website. Tickets for the “Hello” hitmaker’s current shows average around $2,350 (42,673.18).

In an interview with “The Citizen”, Computicket explained that: “Certain aspects regarding the event in question require further clarification and do not currently meet Computicket Box Office’s requirements to list an event.”

The event has since been removed from the site and refunds have started for those who purchased tickets.

“As such it has been suspended and removed from sale pending clarification from the promoter. Refunds for all patrons who purchased tickets have already commenced,” they added.

The fraudulent event was listed on Computicket Box Office, a self-service platform which was launched in 2022 for smaller event organisers.

Traditionally, ticketing services have been accessible only to large event organisers who can afford comprehensive offerings.

The ticketing service provider’s self-service platform aimed to democratise access, providing organisers with the full benefit of its distribution network, including online sales and in-store availability at Shoprite, Checkers and Usave supermarkets.

“Daily vetting and monitoring of events listed on Computicket Box Office are conducted to ensure accuracy of event information and all users are required to agree to the platform’s terms and conditions, acknowledging their responsibilities as event organisers,” Computicket explained.

“To safeguard consumer interests, no funds are disbursed to promoters until after an event has successfully taken place.”

Initially, on July 6, the link to the fraudulent event was still active but, by July 7, it had been suspended.

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